Submit or Track your Manuscript LOG-IN

The Effects of Herbs as Feed Additives Through Feed and Drinking Water on Broiler Blood Parameters

The Effects of Herbs as Feed Additives Through Feed and Drinking Water on Broiler Blood Parameters

Imbang Dwi Rahayu1, Ali Mahmud1*, Wahyu Widodo1, Adi Sutanto1, Apriliana Devi Anggraini1, Devi Dwi Siskawardani2, Wisnu Nurcahyo3, Tri Untari3

1Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Science, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 651444, East Java, Indonesia; 2Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Science, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 651444, East Java, Indonesia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.

 
*Correspondence | Ali Mahmud, Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Science, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, Malang 651444, East Java, Indonesia; Email: alimahmud58@umm.ac.id

ABSTRACT

Using herbs as feed additives in poultry can improve the health that affects the quality of broiler chicken. This study aimed to determine the effects of giving herbs as feed additives through feed and drinking water on the biochemical parameters of broiler blood. In this study, 175 chickens were used and divided into seven levels of treatments; T0 (feed without herbs), T1 (feed + 1% herbs), T2 (Feed + 2% herbs), T3 (Feed + 3% herbs), T4 (drinking water +1% herbal), T5 (drinking water + 2% herbal), T6 (drinking water + 3% herbal). The data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance. As a result, the treatments did not affect (p>0.05) the total plasma protein (TPP), globulin, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and all parameters of the blood profile. However, the herbs’ addition significantly (p<0.05) affected albumin, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and malondialdehyde (MDA). Adding herbs through drinking water gave lower TG and LDL levels than through feed or the control. The control had the lowest level of ALT, which increased along with adding 2% herbs through drinking water. Adding 3% herbs through the feed reached the highest ALT level. Adding herbs through feed and drinking water up to 3% could maintain normal blood parameters (total plasma protein, globulin, cholesterol, HDL, AST, erythrocyte count, leukocyte count, PCV value, and hemoglobin level). On the other hand, the 2% herb addition could maintain the normal levels of albumin and ALT. 
 
Keywords | Blood Biochemistry, Serum Protein Profiles, Serum Fat Profiles

To share on other social networks, click on any share button. What are these?

Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

June

Vol. 12, Iss. 6, pp. 994-1205

Featuring

Click here for more

Subscribe Today

Receive free updates on new articles, opportunities and benefits


Subscribe Unsubscribe