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Diets High in Energy, Protein, Zinc, Iron and Vitamin A and Their Effects on Body Weight in Patients with Tuberculosis

Diets High in Energy, Protein, Zinc, Iron and Vitamin A and Their Effects on Body Weight in Patients with Tuberculosis

Muhammad Ashfaq ur Rahman1*, Saleem Khan1, Aurang Zeb1, Zia ud Din1 and Zafar Iqbal3 

1Department of Human Nutrition, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; 2Nuclear Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; 3Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

 
*Correspondence | Muhammad Ashfaq Ur Rahman, Department of Human Nutrition, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; Email: ashfaq.nutrition@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pTB) often suffer from malnutrition, hence this issue has to be taken into account while designing a treatment plan. Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pTB) seeking treatment at the TB Centre in Baghdada, Pakistan, were surveyed to determine their body weight before and after receiving dietary counseling. A total of 150 patients were enlisted for this prospective analytic case-control (case-cohort) double-blind, randomized feeding experiment, with each group receiving 15 participants on average. Nutritional counseling sessions were provided to patients in the nutrition therapy groups in order to urge them to follow one of nine pre-tailored diets designed to meet the nutrient needs of the group. They were also given food that contained the targeted nutrient(s). Control patients did not participate in these sessions and did not get food rations. Weight fluctuations were among the results of the study. Weight was recorded at baseline, 3 months PI, and 6 months PI. The average weight gain in the nutrient supplementation groups was 2.04 kg. Compared to the pTB patients in the ‘combined dietary’ and ‘combined supplements’ groups, the pTB patients in the ‘caloric protein’ group represented the highest mean weight increase, at 2.9 Kg, increasing from 53.46 to 54.71 Kg in 3-months PI and from 54.71 to 56.33 Kg in 6-months PI, respectively. Weight gains in the nutrition therapy group were statistically significant at both 3 and 6 months PI. Patients in the control group either maintained or lost weight, with an average loss of 3.29 kilograms (7.1 pounds). In conclusion, pTB patients benefited from organized nutrition counselling sessions and the supply of extra food packs, which led to an increase in weight and an improvement in their nutritional condition. 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

February

Pakistan J. Zool., Vol. 56, Iss. 1, pp. 01-501

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