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Study of Biochemical Characters Gives an Insight into the Genetic Variation Present in F2 Populations of Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata L.)

Study of Biochemical Characters Gives an Insight into the Genetic Variation Present in F2 Populations of Ethiopian Mustard (Brassica carinata L.)

Muhammad Nauman1, Iftikhar Ali3, Nazir Ahmad1,2*, Fazli Ahad1 and Touheed Iqbal4

1Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; 2Oil Crops Research Institute, The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China; 3Agriculture and Biotechnology Division, Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad-Pakistan; 4Directorate General Agriculture Research, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

 
*Correspondence | Nazir Ahmad, Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan; Email: nazir_aup@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

The selection of useful variation in crop plants has been a major thrust of early farmers since the dawn of agriculture. This study aimed to estimate genetic variability, heritability, and genetic advance for quality characters in Brassica carinata L. A total of 22 genotypes comprised of six parental lines and their 16 bulked F2 populations were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with three replications at The University of Agriculture Peshawar during 2013-14. Data were recorded on oil content, protein content, oleic acid, glucosinolates, erucic acid, and linolenic acid. Significant genetic differences were observed for all the traits studied. Among parental lines, C-88 performed better for protein content (20.48%) and erucic acid content (50.31%), C-89 for oleic acid (36.15%), and linolenic acid content (10.18%). Among F2 populations, C-95 × C-93, C-88 × C-95, C-97 × C-95, C-88 × C-89, C-93 × C-95 C-97 × C-88 performed better for oil content (51.48%), protein content (21.62%), oleic acid (37.60%), glucosinolates content (88.27 µMg-1), erucic acid (45.98%) and linolenic acid (11.74%), respectively. Moderate (30 < h2 ≤ 60) to high (h2 > 60) broad-sense heritability was observed for all biochemical traits with maximum genetic advance, hence indicated that selection could be effective in the early generation for the improvements of these studied traits. Generally, cross combinations C-88 × C-89, C-93 × C-95, C-97 × C-88 performed better for oleic acid, glucosinolate content, and erucic acid, so that these segregants could be used for biodiesel and other industrial purposes.

 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

February

Vol. 54, Iss. 1, Pages 1-501

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