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Genetic Diversity among Cotton Genotypes for Earliness, Yield and Fiber Quality Traits using Correlation, Principal Component and Cluster Analyses

Genetic Diversity among Cotton Genotypes for Earliness, Yield and Fiber Quality Traits using Correlation, Principal Component and Cluster Analyses

Ghulam Sarwar1, Amna Nazir1*, Muhammad Rizwan1, Eram Shahzadi2 and Abid Mahmood3

1Cotton Research Station, Faisalabad (38000), Pakistan; 2Government College University, Faisalabad (38000), Pakistan; 3Directorate General of Agriculture Research, Faisalabad (38000), Pakistan.

 

 

*Correspondence | Amna Nazir, Cotton Research Station, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan; Email: amnanazir.cri@gmail.com 

ABSTRACT

The upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.) is utmost natural fiber used in textile industry. Awareness about genetic diversity is very essential for fruitful genetic improvement approaches. Correlation, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analyses were performed to estimate genetic diversity in 25 cotton genotypes. Correlation analysis revealed that days to first square, flower and boll opening were positively associated with seed cotton yield. Staple length and CLCuV % were negatively associated with fiber fineness and yield respectively. In principal component analysis, four out of 14 principal components were selected with Eigen value ˃1. The four principal components contributed 79.9% towards variability. In PC-I, there was maximum positive factor loading of earliness traits, fiber fineness and negative factor loading of sympodia per plant and seed cotton yield. In PC-II, there was maximum positive factor loading of bolls per plant and GOT % while negative factor loading for CLCuV % and fiber length. A biplot between PC-I and PC-II showed that major contribution towards variability of fiber fineness and earliness traits among the studied genotypes. In cluster analysis, 25 genotypes were allocated in four clusters. Cluster-I was the largest by having 10 genotypes while clusters-III and IV each having six genotypes, and cluster-II was the smallest having three genotypes.
 

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Sarhad Journal of Agriculture

June

Vol. 37, Iss. 2, Pages 331-713

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