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Exploring the Utility of Light Traps for Early Detection and Management of Rice Insect Pests

Exploring the Utility of Light Traps for Early Detection and Management of Rice Insect Pests

Bilal Atta1*, Arshed Makhdoom Sabir1, Muhammad Dildar Gogi2, Muhammad Asif Farooq3, Muhammad Ijaz1, Tahir Hussain Awan1, Muhammad Ahsin Ayub4, Muhammad Usman Saleem1, Amara Nasiba1

1Rice Research Institute, Kala Shah Kaku, Punjab, Pakistan.
2Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.
3Institute of Plant Protection, Muhammad Nawaz Shareef University of Agriculture, Multan, Punjab, Pakistan.
4Rice Research Station, Bahawalnagar, Punjab, Pakistan.
 
Corresponding Author: Bilal Atta
bilal.atta@aari.punjab.gov.pk

ABSTRACT

The study was aimed to evaluate the utility of light traps for early detection and management of rice insect pests (for preserving crop yields, preventing economic losses, and ensuring food security) by analyzing the population dynamics of rice insect pests, focusing on six species: Scirpophaga innotata, Sesamia inferens, Scirpophaga incertulas, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, Sogatella furcifera and Nilaparvata lugens. Population data spanning four years (2019-2022) were collected through the use of light traps revealed distinct peak populations for each species at different times. Scirpophaga innotata exhibited a consistent peak population in September, with a significant increase from 2019 to 2020, followed by a decline from 2020 to 2021. However, a remarkable increase was observed from 2021 to 2022. Sesamia inferens displayed varying peak populations across the years, with a slight decrease from 2019 to 2020, a significant increase from 2020 to 2021, and a subsequent decline. Scirpophaga incertulas showed different peak populations at various times throughout the years, experiencing significant declines from 2019 to 2020 and from 2020 to 2021, followed by a decrease in 2022. Cnaphalocrocis medinalis demonstrated varying peak populations, experiencing a significant decrease from 2019 to 2020 and a subsequent decline from 2020 to 2021. Notably, C. medinalis was absent in 2022. Sogatella furcifera displayed different peak populations across the years, experiencing significant declines from 2019 to 2020, from 2020 to 2021, and from 2021 to 2022. Nilaparvata lugens exhibited varying peak populations, with a significant decrease from 2019 to 2020, a significant increase from 2020 to 2021, and a slight decrease from 2021 to 2022. These results offer important information about the time-related patterns of insect pests affecting rice. They provide a useful resource for safeguarding rice crops by enabling well-timed and effective pest control strategies based on the specific timing of each pest species. This underscores the significance of early identification using light traps in order to detect pests early on. Implementing timely pest control measures based on these observations can help protect rice crops from significant damage. 
 
Novelty Statement | The novelty of this study lies in its investigation of the effectiveness of light traps for early detection and management of rice insect pests. By analyzing population data spanning multiple years, the study provides novel insights into the temporal dynamics of six specific insect species, highlighting their peak populations at different times. This research contributes to the understanding of pest population dynamics and emphasizes the significance of utilizing light traps for timely and effective pest management in rice crops.

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

June

Pakistan J. Zool., Vol. 56, Iss. 3, pp. 1001-1500

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