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The Dominance Hierarchy of the Female Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkeys, Rhinopithecus bieti

The Dominance Hierarchy of the Female Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkeys, Rhinopithecus bieti

Kai Huang1,2, Wancai Xia1,2, Yi Fu3, Yaqiong Wan4, Hao Feng2, Ali Krzton5, Jiaqi Li4,* and Dayong Li1,2,*

1Institute of Rare Animals and Plants, China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, Sichuan Province, China
2Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation (Ministry of Education), China West Normal University, Nanchong 637009, Sichuan Province, China
3Irradiation Preservation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Institute of Atomic Energy, Chengdu 610101, Sichuan Province, China
4Environmental Protection Key Laboratory on Biosafety, Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Ecology and Environment, Nanjing 210042, Jiangsu Province, China
5RBD Library, Auburn University, Auburn 36849, Alabama, USA
 
Kai Huang and Wancai Xia have contributed equally to this work.

*      Corresponding authors: 980119lsc@163.com;
lijiaqihao@163.com

ABSTRACT

Dominance hierarchies are common in social mammals, especially primates. The formation of social hierarchies is conducive to solving the problem of the allocation of scarce resources among individuals. From August 2015 to July 2016, we observed a wild, provisioned Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti) group at Xiangguqing in Baimaxueshan National Nature Reserve, Yunnan Province, China. Aggressive and submissive behaviors were used to investigate dominance hierarchies between female individuals in the same one-male unit (OMU), and the grooming reciprocity index was used to detect reciprocal relationships between these females within the OMU. The results showed that loose social hierarchies exist among the females in each OMU, and more dominant individuals have higher grooming incomes. These results are consistent with the aggressive-submissive hypothesis and the resource control hypothesis.
 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

October

Vol. 53, Iss. 5, Pages 1603-2000

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