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Feasibility of Type D Botulinum Toxin for Rodent Prevention and Control in Plateau Pastoral Areas

Feasibility of Type D Botulinum Toxin for Rodent Prevention and Control in Plateau Pastoral Areas

Li Shengqing1,2,3, Zhang Xiyun2,3, Liu Shengcai2,3, Hu Guoyuan2, Fan Yuxia2,Liu Huaixin2, Wang Tingting2 and Zhang Yanming1*

1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University, Yang Ling, 712100, China    
2Qinghai Academy of Animal Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Xining, 810016, China
3State Key Laboratory of Plateau Ecology and Agriculture, Qinghai University, Xining, 810016, China 

*      Corresponding author: zhangym@nwsuaf.edu.cn

Fig. 1.

Schematic of the plot test of type D botulinum toxin administration to plateau zokors; A, 20,000 MLD/g granular bait; B, 10,000 MLD/g barley bait; C, 15,000 MLD/g barley bait; D, 20,000 MLD/g barley bait; CK, 50 m isolation belt.

Fig. 2.

SDS-PAGE results for the components of type D8901 botulinum in 40% ammonium sulfate. 1, 100% supernatant40µĺ+β-ME; 2, 100% supernatant40µĺ-β-ME; 3, 40% supernatant15µĺ+β-ME; 4, 40% supernatant15µĺ-β-ME; 5-9, 40% supernatant 15µĺ-β-ME.

Fig. 3.

Electrophoretic analysis of gene fragment of botulinum neurotoxin type D.

Fig. 4.

(a) Plasmid identification after BT1 cloning, (b) Plasmid identification after BT2 cloning. BT1, light chain fragment; BT2, Heavy chain fragment.

Fig. 5.

Protein functional domain composition of botulinum toxin.

Fig. 6.

Morphological characteristics (Micrograph (a) and electron micrograph (b)) of Clostridium botulinum.

Fig. 7.

(a), Grassland damage caused by plateau pika; (b), Mound caused by plateau zokor.

Pakistan Journal of Zoology

June

Vol. 53, Iss. 3, Pages 801-1200

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