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Exploration of Anti-Microbial Resistant (AMR) Genes in the Gastrointestinal Microbiome of Birds of Paradise (Paradisaeidae) in Papua, Indonesia

Exploration of Anti-Microbial Resistant (AMR) Genes in the Gastrointestinal Microbiome of Birds of Paradise (Paradisaeidae) in Papua, Indonesia

Alif Rahman Rohim Puarada*, Safika, Agustin Indrawati

School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, IPB University, Bogor, Indonesia.

 
*Correspondence | Alif Rahman Rohim Puarada, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, IPB University, Bogor, Indonesia; Email: alif.rahman44@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

In avian ecology, the gastrointestinal microbiome is pivotal in influencing host health, contributing to metabolic processes, and shaping ecological interactions. The escalating global significance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes within diverse microbiota components has garnered increasing attention due to its profound consequences. Recent investigations have revealed the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among wild bird species in remote habitats, suggesting the potential for these avian populations to serve as reservoirs and sources for emergent AMR profiles. Recognizing the critical role of wildlife in AMR dynamics this study focuses on birds of paradise, indigenous to Indonesia. Their gastrointestinal microbiome, intricately shaped by a unique ecological milieu, presents a compelling avenue for exploring AMR genes’ reservoir and dissemination mechanisms. Fecal samples were collected from Papua, Indonesia. The DNA was extracted using the DNeasy Power Soil Pro Kit. A shotgun metagenomic sequencing process from the MGI DNBSEQ-G400 platform was carried out to obtain DNA sequence data from the genes in the sample. The resulting DNA sequence data were then analyzed using MEGAN6 software using the SEED subsystem. The investigation reveals a notable abundance of AMR genes, with bacitracin resistance standing out prominently, particularly associated with the prevalence of Bacillus pumilus. Metal and environmental resistance mechanisms underscore the complex adaptations within the birds’ gastrointestinal. The study highlights concern regarding the elevated presence of antibiotic resistance genes, particularly those associated with synthetic antibiotics, pointing to potential environmental exposures, including agricultural antibiotic use.
 
Keywords | AMR genes, Avian gastrointestinal microbiome, Birds of paradise, Shotgun metagenomics

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Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences

June

Vol. 12, Iss. 6, pp. 994-1205

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