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Cost-Benefit Analysis and Adoption Prospects of Selected Moisture Conservation Technologies in Pothwar, Punjab

Cost-Benefit Analysis and Adoption Prospects of Selected Moisture Conservation Technologies in Pothwar, Punjab

Abid Hussain1, Mubbashira Nazir2*, Saira Batool2 and Sidra Majeed1

1Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), PARC-National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC), Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Social Science Division (SSD), Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC), Islamabad, Pakistan.

 
*Correspondence | Mubbashira Nazir, Social Science Division (SSD), Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC), Islamabad, Pakistan; Email: mubbashira.nazir@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Economic analyses of moisture conservation for groundnut and wheat crops through gypsum application, and adoption of micro-catchments for olive orchards and fruit trees in rain-fed Pothwar have been carried out. Socioeconomic characteristics of the adopter farmers have also been studied. The study is based on primary data that was collected from 110 sample farmers in the year 2018. It is found that adopters of the gypsum technology are more educated, having large family size, operational land and livestock holdings. Gypsum application at a rate of 0.26 ton per acre doubled the productivity (26.80 mounds/ 40kg) of groundnut crop than without its use. Benefit-cost ratios (BCRs) for groundnut crop with and without gypsum application are 4.47 and 3.23, respectively. Similarly, productivity of wheat crop with application of 0.66 ton gypsum per acre is higher (32.25 mounds) than normal practice by 84.3 percent. Benefit-cost ratios with and without gypsum application for wheat crop are 1.38 and 1.16, respectively. Micro-catchment technology is mostly adopted by women (60%) for fruit trees in house courtyards, and by large farmers for olive orchards. Most of the adopters of the technology reported to have membership in community-based organizations. Adoption of the technology in olive and mixed fruits orchards resulted in BCRs of 1.63 and 30.91, respectively. Thus, in rain-fed ecology of Pothwar Punjab, moisture conservation through gypsum application for major crops, and water harvesting through micro-catchments for fruit trees are promising productivity and profitability enhancing farming technologies. Access to market and enabling institutions are critical for adoption of these technologies. Characteristics of adopters of these technologies as delineated above should also be given due consideration in promotion of the technologies.

 

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Pakistan Journal of Agricultural Research

March

Vol. 35, Iss. 1, Pages 1-258

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