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Effect of LED Lighting on Hatchability and Chick Performance of Chicken Eggs

Effect of LED Lighting on Hatchability and Chick Performance of Chicken Eggs

Karim El-Sabrout* and Mohamed H. Khalil

Department of Poultry Production, Faculty of Agriculture, El-Shatby, P.O. Box 21545, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt

*     Corresponding author: kareem.badr@alexu.edu.eg

ABSTRACT
Using light generally during chicken eggs incubation has been shown to affect hatchability, but using light-emitting diode (LED) precisely has not been fully examined. This study aims to evaluate the effect of LED lighting during incubation of Fayoumi eggs on hatchability (period length, dead embryos and percentage) and hatch chick performance (weight, vitality). The experiment was carried out in two groups with total number of 1800 eggs (900 eggs for each group). Eggs were incubated 12 h of light (natural) then 12 h of complete darkness (G1); and 12 h of light (natural) then 12 h of LED lighting (G2). From the obtained results, there were no significant effects of complement LED lighting” after effect on hatchability percent and dead embryos. There were differences observed in chick performance between the two groups, chick weight at hatch was significantly heavier in group of eggs exposed to complement LED lighting during incubation (G2) with high vitality percent than the eggs of G1 (control). We could conclude that providing LED light during incubation can improve chick performance.

 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology (Associated Journals)

October

Vol. 49, Iss. 5, Pages 1547-1936

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