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Prevalence and Risk Factors Analysis for Cryptosporidium in Apparently Healthy Lambs of Southern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Prevalence and Risk Factors Analysis for Cryptosporidium in Apparently Healthy Lambs of Southern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Naimat Ullah Khan1,2, Muhammad Hassan Saleem1, Aneela Zameer Durrani1Nisar Ahmad3, Ayesha Hassan1, Muhammad Kashif Prince1, Muhammad Luqman Sohail4,*, Mian Saeed Sarwar2, Hazrat Ali2, Tahir Usman2, Asadullah Khan2, Siffat Ullah Khan3 and Shahid Zaman5

1Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore
2College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan
3Department of Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore
4University College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 
5Department of Microbiology, Quaid e Azam University, Islamabad

*      Corresponding author: vet.luqman@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT

Cryptosporidium is considered one of the major gastrointestinal pathogens in young ruminants and has been associated with diarrhea. The current study was conducted in three selected districts (Bannu, Lakki Marwat and Kohat) of southern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) to determine the prevalence and risk factors responsible for the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in lambs and has been known to cause human infection. Three hundred and sixty fecal samples (n=360) were collected through convenient sampling from apparently healthy lambs and were examined using the modified Ziehl Neelsen acid fast staining. Prevalence was calculated along with different risk factors associated with the disease (month, age, sex and season). Results showed highest prevalence (P < 0.05) of the Cryptosporidium in Kohat (33.33%) followed by Lakki Marwat (25%), while the lowest percent prevalence was recorded in Bannu (23.33%). Highest month-wise prevalence was recorded in the month of August (46.6%), followed by July (40%), and the lowest during February and December (16.66%). Results showed highest prevalence in summer season (36.66%), while the lowest in the winter season (18.33%). The highest prevalence (P < 0.05) was recorded at the age of ≤1-15 days (38.09%) followed by 16-30 days (29.41%) while the lowest was at the age of ≥31-60 days or above (15.15%). In lambs, the females had higher (P < 0.05) prevalence (31.18%) then males (22.98%). This study addresses the prevalence of infection in lambs, responsible for the spread of etiological agent in environment.
 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

June

Vol. 50, Iss. 3, Pages 799-1198

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