Submit or Track your Manuscript LOG-IN

Impact of Horse Age and Body Weight on the Angle Between the Parietal Surface of the Coffin Bone and the Ground

Impact of Horse Age and Body Weight on the Angle Between the Parietal Surface of the Coffin Bone and the Ground

Małgorzata Dzierzęcka1, Sławomir Paśko2, Marcin Komosa3, Karolina Barszcz1, Bartłomiej Jan Bartyzel1 and Ewa Czerniawska-Piątkowska4*

1Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Morphological Science, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 166, 02 776 Warsaw, Poland
2Faculty of Mechatronics, Virtual Reality Technologies Department, The Institute of Micromechanics and Photonics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Sw. Andrzeja Boboli 8, 02 525 Warsaw, Poland
3Department of Animal Anatomy, Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, ul. Wojska Polskiego 28, 60 637 Poznan, Poland 
4Department of Ruminant Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology, ul. Klemensa Janickiego 29, 71-270 Szczecin, Poland

*      Corresponding author: ewa.czerniawska-piatkowska@zut.edu.pl

ABSTRACT

This study analyzed the impact of horse age and body weight on the angle between the parietal surface of the coffin bone and the ground. A precise description of the plantar margin and the inclination of the parietal surface of the bone may contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanics and strength of the hoof, in particular in horses with higher body weights. The study material included coffin bones of the thoracic limb, isolated post-mortem from 39 cold-blood horses. The study employed a scanner projecting a hybrid set of images, consisting of sinusoidal stripes preceded by a Gray code sequence, to perform the measurements. This method enabled the first objective assessment of the distribution of angles between the coffin bone parietal surface and the ground, which had not been possible using other imaging methods. The angle between the coffin bone parietal surface and the ground was found to be correlated with age, with a 0.27 correlation coefficient at p=0.1, but not with body weight. The correlation coefficient for body weight was -0.08 at p=0.64.
 

To share on other social networks, click on P-share. What are these?

Pakistan Journal of Zoology

April

Vol. 53, Iss. 2, Pages 401-800

Featuring

Click here for more

Subscribe Today

Receive free updates on new articles, opportunities and benefits


Subscribe Unsubscribe