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Growth Potential of Camelus dromedarius Calves Reared under Intensive and Extensive Feeding Management Systems

Growth Potential of Camelus dromedarius Calves Reared under Intensive and Extensive Feeding Management Systems

Asim Faraz*

Department of Livestock and Poultry Production, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan, Pakistan

*      Corresponding author: drasimfaraz@bzu.edu.pk

ABSTRACT

A four-month study was carried out to check the growth potential of Marecha (Camelus dromedarius) calves in intensive management system (IMS) and extensive management system (EMS) in Thal desert, Punjab Pakistan. Twelve male and female calves were divided into two comparable groups of six each containing three males and three females. The first group calves were fed concentrate @ 1 kg/h/d plus crop residues of gram (Cicer arientinum) ad libitum while in second group calves were allowed grazing/browsing for 10 h daily along with household refusals. Twice watering was provided. Fortnightly weighing of calves was done by digital scale. Data collected on different parameters was subjected to statistical analysis with 2×2 factorial arrangements of treatments under completely randomized design. After 120 days trial period the mean body weight and average daily gain (ADG) of male and female calves was significantly increased (P<0.05) in IMS as 80.8±2.7, 77.8±2.7 kg and 0.67±0.02, 0.65±0.02 kg/d than EMS as 64.7±2.6, 52.3±2.6 kg and 0.54±0.02, 0.44±0.02 kg/d of male and female calves. Intake of crop residues (P<0.05) was found to be 6.9±0.45 and 6.4±0.45 kg/d in male and female calves, respectively in IMS and 3.5±0.23 for male and female calves both in EMS. The total feeding cost per calf for 120 days was higher in IMS than EMS while the cost per kg body weight gain was less and economical in the former as compared to the latter group. In behavioral preference the first in order was kari (Capparis spinosa), dhaman (Cenchrus ciliaris) and kikar (Acacia nilotica) among bushes, grasses and trees, respectively for male and female calves in EMS.
 

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

August

Vol. 52, Iss. 4, Pages 1225-1630

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