Submit or Track your Manuscript LOG-IN

Effect of Live Yeast Supplementation on Dry Matter Intake, Body Condition Score, Body Weight, and Serum Health Biomarkers of Beetal Goats during the Transition Period

Effect of Live Yeast Supplementation on Dry Matter Intake, Body Condition Score, Body Weight, and Serum Health Biomarkers of Beetal Goats during the Transition Period

Shaista Abbas1,Imtiaz Rabbani1, Hafsa Zaneb2, M. Shahbaz Yousaf1, Saima Ashraf2, Abid Hussain Shahzad3, M. Afzal Rashid4 and Habib Rehman1,*

1Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Outfall Road, Lahore
2Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore
3Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Jhang
4Department of Animal Nutrition, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore

*      Corresponding author: habibrehman@uvas.edu.pk

ABSTRACT

Transition period in ruminants is defined as a phase of 3 weeks preceding and post parturition. It is characterized by metabolic stress, reduced feed intake, intense mobilization of energy reserves, increased nutritional requirements and changes in dams’ metabolism. Yeast Supplementation has been found to increase the production performance and nutrient digestibility in ruminants. However, when compared with large ruminants there is scarcity of the data reporting the effects of dietary yeast in transition goats. Therefore, a trial was planned to elucidate the effects of various inclusion levels of live dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on dry matter intake (DMI), body condition score (BCS), body weight (BW) and serum health biomarkers in Beetal goats during the transition period. Twenty-four Beetal goats were randomly allotted to three groups YSC0, YSC5 and YSC10 and were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0g, 5g or 10g yeast day/animal, respectively for 4 weeks before and -4 weeks after kidding. When compared with the non-supplemented goats, dietary yeast improved (P<0.05) DMI during transition period however, BCS (P = 0.81) and BW (P = 0.59) did not vary amongst the groups. During postpartum period, results of the serum biomarkers revealed higher glucose (P=0.02) and lower (P = 0.002) non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) levels in the supplemented vs. non-supplemented goats. Compared with non-supplemented goats, reduced serum cholesterol (P = 0.05) and elevated catalase levels (P = 0.19) were observed in yeast-supplemented goats. Nevertheless, the treatment and treatment into time interaction for serum cholesterol and catalase levels remained insignificant during the transition period. A lower (P = 0.006) serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and higher (P = 0.05) thyroxine was found in yeast-supplemented goats with insignificant treatment into day interactions during postpartum period. Serum urea, total proteins, albumin, globulin, albumin to globulin ratio, triiodothyronine, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase remained unchanged amongst the groups during the transition period. In conclusion, dietary yeast supplementation has resulted in better DMI and has a potential to improve the ability of Beetal goats to counteract the metabolic stress imposed by the transition period.
 

To share on other social networks, click on P-share. What are these?

Pakistan Journal of Zoology

August

Vol. 52, Iss. 4, Pages 1225-1630

Featuring

Click here for more

Subscribe Today

Receive free updates on new articles, opportunities and benefits


Subscribe Unsubscribe