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Biological and Molecular Detection of Fig latent trichovirus in Naturally Infected Fig Plants

Biological and Molecular Detection of Fig latent trichovirus in Naturally Infected Fig Plants

Hanaa H.A. Gomaa1*, Dalia Y.Z. Amin1, Mona A. Ismail1 and Khalid A. El-Dougdoug2

1Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; 2Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

 
*Correspondence |Hanaa H.A. Gomaa, Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt; Email: hgoumaa@hotmail.com 

ABSTRACT

Different external symptoms of chlorotic to yellowish mottling, mosaic spots and deformation were observed in leaves of fig plants. To evaluate the presence of Fig latent virus (FLV -1) in fig plants. One hundreds fig trees were collected with virus-like symptoms and symptomless fig trees. The virus was detected by DAS-ELISA. Infected fig leaves were mechanically inoculated on Chenopodium amaranticolor L. and reinoculated on Ch. amaranticolar L. and Nicotiana glutinosa for virus propagation. Fresh wood cuttings (4-6 nodes) were collected from naturally infected fig plants. Healthy fig plants were grafting-inoculated with chip budding of infected fig plants and kept in a greenhouse. Symptoms were confirmed by DAS-ELISA. Strips of infected and healthy N. glutinosa leaves were viewed under light microscope. Extracted infectious sap of N. glutinosa leaves was examined using Transmission Electron Microscope. Total RNA was isolated from fig leaves showing symptoms and symptomless. Phylogenetic relationships were evaluated. Virus particles were detected by DAS-ELISA in extracts from inoculated host leaves. The virus was transmitted by grafting on fig plants and sap inoculation on a very restricted host range of herbaceous plants where showing latent symptom. The virus with flexible rod particle ca. 650 nm long denoted FLV in fig trees in Egypt orchards. The viral Coat protein gene structure resembles that of members of the genus Trichovirusin the family Flexiviridae. In this study, the virus isolated from fig plants belongs to the genus Trichovirus in the family Flexiviridae.

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Pakistan Journal of Zoology

February

Vol. 55, Iss. 1, Pages 1-500

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